All posts tagged “chapbook

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Lesley LeRoux on “Phases” by Danielle Perry

Originally posted on VAGABOND CITY:
Just reading the author note that precedes Danielle Perry’s Phases (Sad Spell Press), her first chapbook, is enough to spark your enthusiasm over what’s to come. She’s a tarot reader who is “generally amping up her witchiness,” and who couldn’t…

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Nostrovia! Poetry’s 2015 Chapbook Contest: Presale Updates

Heyyyyo, friends! Only one week into presales, and we’ve already had twenty purchases–tremendous thanks to all of you for your support! We’re excited to see so many of you enjoying our bundle offer. If you haven’t already, be sure to swing by the Nostrovia! Store–we’re still doing presales at a “pay-what-you-can + $5 shipping” model for these limited edition print copies. Jeremiah and I can’t wait to fire out all this great writing in early July.

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REVIEW OF “FAREWELL MATERIALS” BY KYLE HARVEY

A calm testimony to time and the ways we repeat ourselves, Kyle Harvey’s “Farewell Materials” operates through echoes, with each reiterated phrase navigating its varying contexts to achieve broader meaning. If the collection’s opening page—“Adagio, let’s say // three // slow // beats // or so”—is equal parts request and statement of mood, then its final pages channel the older aesthetic of a record player, looping its final bit until being turned off.

Much like Harvey’s serial poem, “July,” this newer collection showcases a deep awareness of spatial minimalism and a word’s placement within. And being “a half-hearted // banjo gambler // singing // softly // to // the moon,” Kyle works with his words to make them into sheet music, with each long caesura honoring all, too, that waits in silence.

And yet, “Farewell Materials” is also the softening and hardening layers of adulthood. A prayer and a change—“for years / & years” the speaker confesses what surrounded him while he slept, the time spent waiting, the heavy eyelids. Like “bits of glass / treasured,” much of this collection is tucked away, desiring the reader like an act of extraction.